Monthly Archives: September 2019

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Ohio State freshman running back J.K. Dobbins (2) runs the ball in the first quarter in the game against Penn State on Oct. 28. Ohio State won 39-38. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorDespite a 15-point fourth-quarter deficit, No. 3 Ohio State (7-1, 5-0 Big Ten) rode a stupendous performance from quarterback J.T. Barrett to a 39-38 victory against No. 7 Penn State (7-1, 4-1 Big Ten) in a battle of Big Ten powers. Head coach Urban Meyer addressed the media Monday afternoon following the victory. Here are three takeaways from the press conference.Improved offensive line led to comeback winJust a year ago, then-No. 2 Ohio State played a close game against the Nittany Lions, but crumbled on the final drive and fell 24-21 to unranked Penn State. Meyer believes this season, the Buckeyes’ resilience in tough situations did not exist a year ago.“The team last year would not have won that game,” Meyer said. “They would have dropped their head. Offensive line would have dropped their head.”Right tackle Isaiah Prince struggled in last season’s loss to Penn State. He looked overmatched the entire game and allowed multiple sacks as the clock ticked closer to zero on what would be Ohio State’s final drive. But Prince has matured after a year of experience and coaching, Meyer said. The head coach was incredulous when asked whether he was worried about Prince heading into last Saturday’s game.“He’s unbelievable now,” Meyer said. “Isaiah, not worried about him at all. He’s a grown man that’s handling his stuff the way a right offensive tackle at Ohio State should.”All five starting offensive linemen graded as successful on between 82 and 86 percent of their plays. Meyer deemed them all to have “champion” effort. Meyer does not want to “micromanage” running back carriesIn the first quarter, freshman running back J.K. Dobbins exploded, taking four carries for 50 yards, including a 21-yard rush. But he did not touch the ball again until the third quarter as redshirt sophomore running back Mike Weber took all seven second-quarter carries.Dobbins finished with 13 rushes for 88 yards while Weber had 21 yards and a touchdown on seven carries. Meyer said he does not, and would not want to, involve himself in divvying up the carries.“[Dobbins] still had 88 yards and however many carries,” Meyer said. “So we’re throwing the ball so darn well right now, too. So there’s no, once again I don’t micromanage. That’s Kevin Wilson, and that’s Tony Alford to determine. And they’re both practicing very hard. You’d like to get them more carries.”Meyer said he trusts good coaches to make playing-time decisions when the players are “1-A” and “1-B.” “[Running backs coach] Tony Alford is an excellent football coach,” Meyer said. “The last thing he needs is me worrying about that stuff.”Meyer said Weber has “really done a nice job” this season despite an injury which hampered him and made possible Dobbins’ surge, but also mentioned the 2016 starter was humbled. Meyer said Weber’s goal is to reach close to 2,000 rushing yards in a season. But with Dobbins accompanying him in the backfield for the foreseeable future, his path to reaching 2,000 yards is unclear.Search remains for a solution to kickoffsIt took just 15 seconds into Saturday’s game for Penn State to take advantage of Ohio State’s biggest weakness — kickoff coverage — as running back Saquon Barkley returned the opening kick 97 yards to give the Nittany Lions an early six-point lead.After the game, Meyer called the kickoff unit, which he said has historically been near the best in the conference, “comical.” Monday afternoon, he said it was “a joke right now.” “We’re the only school in the America that can’t kick it out of the end zone, even with the wind at our back,” Meyer said. “I’m not a kicking expert but kick the ball out of the end zone and we don’t do that. It’s not because of not telling them to kick the ball out of the end zone.”Former Ohio State punter Cameron Johnston disputed the claim. He took to Twitter to say he does not believe Meyer’s claim about not being able to kick the ball out of the end zone, as he said he has seen both kickers do so firsthand.Regardless of how the Buckeyes fix the unit, they cannot afford to continue to send out the same unit expecting different results. If something doesn’t change, the number in Ohio State’s loss column will. read more

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Ohio State Utility player Noah McGowan (4) hits the ball foul during the sixth inning of Ohio State’s 2-1 win against Cal State Northridge in extra innings on Friday, March 16, 2018 at Nick Swisher field in Bill Davis Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Credit: Ebo Amissah-Aggrey | Lantern ReporterOhio State junior second baseman Brady Cherry stood tall after a game-tying double in the bottom of the 10th inning, but was soon running again. Sophomore right fielder Noah McGowan chopped a 2-0 fastball through the hole on the left side of the infield sending Cherry down the baseline and around third base.Cherry scored the game-clinching run with ease, and the Buckeyes overcame the Georgetown Hoyas in a 5-4 extra-inning thriller.“I was just trying to get down the line,” McGowan said. “I just try to hit the ball hard and let whatever happen happen after that.”Ohio State’s offense was sputtering the entire game. Through eight innings, the Buckeyes (16-7) stranded 10 runners in scoring position. But the crowd at Bill Davis Stadium rose as a ball off the bat of senior left fielder Tyler Cowles flew high into a cold March sky that had blown balls back toward the fence all game. This one cleared the left field fence, knocked in two runs and tied the game at three in the bottom of the ninth inning.“I was literally just trying to get a hit,” Cowles said. “[Georgetown pitcher Matt Randolph] ended up hanging a changeup and I just put a barrel on it.”Freshman shortstop Eddie McCabe delivered a lead-taking single, knocking freshman right fielder James Gabor in from third base with two outs in the 10th inning to put Georgetown (6-16) up 4-3.That was McCabe’s second RBI of the game.In the top of the fourth inning with runners on the corners and no outs, he smacked a ball on the left side of the infield. Ohio State junior shortstop Kobie Foppe slid smoothly into a backhanded stop before flipping the ball to second baseman Brady Cherry. McCabe was called safe, despite Ohio State head coach Greg Beals arguing the call, and the game’s first run scored.Georgetown scored an additional run in the inning with two outs on an infield single by sophomore center fielder Ryan Davis.With senior Seth Kinker on the mound for the Buckeyes in the eighth inning, Georgetown senior second baseman Jake Bernstein looped a single into left field that went under Cowles’ glove and into the corner. Bernstein advanced to third on the play, then scored on sophomore first baseman Freddy Achecar III’s dribbler down the first-base line to give Georgetown a 3-1 lead.“You’ve just gotta take care of the baseball,” Beals said. “It’s good that it happened and we won because now [Cowles] knows when he does his drill work he’s gotta make sure he’s clean.”Redshirt senior pitcher Adam Niemeyer started for Ohio State, going five innings with two earned runs, five strikeouts and one walk.Niemeyer relied on his fastball early early and mixed in a changeup. He struck out four batters in a row between the first and second innings. Kinker entered in the seventh inning in relief of Yianni Pavlopoulos and delivered four innings with one earned run for his fourth win of the year.“I felt a little bad for [Pavlopoulos],” Beals said. “But on the other hand we thought that we had gotten to the point in the game where Kinker could take us to the finish line.”Georgetown junior Jack Cushing, using a strong fastball, struck out four Ohio State batters before he lost command of the strike zone toward the end of the third inning. He finished with one earned run and six walks after 4.1 innings.Foppe, who had two putouts and five assists, was a bright spot for an otherwise spotty Ohio State defense. The Buckeyes committed two errors compared to Georgetown’s single error.Ohio State junior catcher Jacob Barnwell cut down both Hoyas attempting to steal, despite Georgetown’s 93 percent success rate on stolen bases this season. read more

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Buckeye fans celebrate following the game against Michigan State on Jan. 7 in Value City Arena. Ohio State won 80-64. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorOhio State students might receive a price break to watch their men’s basketball team play.Students would pay just $9 for all individual game tickets if the proposal is approved by the Board of Trustees Finance Committee. Previously, students had to pay $13 for Big Ten games and $12 for nonconference game. Ohio State enjoyed a resurgent 2017-18 season, and the success the team found led to an increase in attendance for the team. An average of 13,495 people attended games at the Schottenstein Center during the 2017-18 season, well above the 12,324 average of the 2016-17 season and the 12,283 average of the 2015-16 campaign. Ohio State also hosted crowds above 18,000 fans on two occasions, first against Illinois on Feb. 4 and against Iowa on Feb. 10. The Board is set to go over the proposal at approximately 12:55 p.m. Thursday during the Finance Committee Meeting.The remainder of the tickets will not see a price change from the cost for the previous season. Season-ticket holders will continue to have a 12-percent discount from the price of a season’s worth of individual tickets while faculty and staff will have a 20-percent discount.The Ohio State Board of Trustees Finance Committee will vote Thursday on a proposal to reduce ticket prices for students while leaving the remainder of the tickets the same. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio StateOhio State is coming off its first season under head coach Chris Holtmann in which it finished 25-9 overall with a 15-3 Big Ten record. The Buckeyes lost just two games at home — 79-65 against Clemson on Nov. 29 and 82-79 on a buzzer-beating loss to Penn State on Jan. 25. The overall record was the team’s best mark since the 2012-13 season.The Buckeyes also reached the NCAA Tournament for the first time since the 2014-15 season. Fifth-seeded Ohio State lost in the second round to fourth-seeded Gonzaga.Holtmann will hope to find continued success in his second season at the helm despite a litany of losses. His team saw three seniors graduate in guard Kam Williams, guard Andrew Dakich and forward Jae’Sean Tate and watched forward and 2018 Big Ten Player of the Year Keita Bates-Diop declare for the NBA draft, forgoing his final year of collegiate eligibility.Joining Ohio State will be the 23rd-best recruiting class in the nation, according to 247Sports composite rankings. Guard Luther Muhammad and forward Jaedon LeDee are the only two four-star prospects joining the team while a pair of three star recruits — guard Duane Washington and forward Justin Ahrens — also join the team. read more

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Ohio State then-freshman forward Tatum Skaggs (11) races to the puck in the first period of the game against Minnesota on Jan. 19. Ohio State won 3-2. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignThe Ohio State women’s hockey team (11-5, 7-3 WCHA) capped off a series sweep of Minnesota Duluth (5-6-1, 3-5-1 WCHA) with a 4-1 win on Saturday. Sophomore forward Tatum Skaggs led the way, earning the second hat trick of her college career.“It always feels good to sweep back at home and be able to put up a really great game for the fans,” Skaggs said. “Getting three goals is great, but that is not the main focus of what happened this weekend. We swept, and that is all that matters.”Much like Friday’s matchup, Minnesota Duluth took the lead early, less than four minutes into the first period. It was junior forward Sydney Brodt who snuck a shot around the corner by Ohio State goaltender Andrea Braendli to give the Bulldogs a 1-0 advantage. Sophomore forward Anna Klein and freshman forward Gabbie Hughes assisted Brodt on the goal. Continuing the trend of similarities to Friday’s matchup, the game was tied up by Ohio State 12 minutes into the first period when the Buckeyes took advantage of a Minnesota Duluth penalty.Skaggs scored her first goal of the game for Ohio State getting a rebound on the power play from a blocked shot by sophomore forward Emma Maltais and slapping it in. Maltais and redshirt junior defenseman Jincy Dunne were given assists on the play. Ohio State head coach Nadine Muzerall praised Skaggs’ play and her team’s resilience throughout the game.“When you play in a league like this, you need those reliable players or go to players like Tatum,” Muzerall said. “Playing against an Olympic gold medalist goalie and putting six goals on her in two games speaks volumes to our tenacity in front of the net. We were very relentless, and I am very proud of how they did not quit and kept plugging away.”With momentum on their side, the Buckeyes continued their relentless attack on Bulldog goaltender, redshirt junior Maddie Rooney. Ohio State’s efforts were rewarded just over a minute after their previous goal, less than 14 minutes in the first period. Freshman forward Sara Saekkinen found the net for the Buckeyes, giving them a 2-1 lead. Senior forward Madison Field and junior forward Olivia Soares were credited with assists for their effort on the goal. The second period saw no goals scored for either team, with Ohio State successfully killingtwo Bulldog penalties to maintain its 2-1 lead. The Buckeye defense limited Minnesota Duluth to only eight shots on goal for the entire period.Muzerall praised the Buckeye defense for its efforts against a talented Bulldog offense.“We worked on our forwards making sure they played 200 feet to back check,” Muzerall said. “If you know you have players coming through the middle of the ice, you can play a little more aggressive. We’ve been working on our forward angling and also on our gap control. We’ve done a better job with our stick positioning and they’ve just been more disciplined lately.”Ohio State continued firing shots at Rooney and got one in the net when Skaggs scored her second goal of the game seven minutes into the third period.Skaggs said she was pleased with how the Buckeyes took advantage of opportunities to score off Rooney.“You can’t take anything away from her, there’s a reason why she has a gold medal.” Skaggs said. “She played really well, but I think we just capitalized off their mistakes and it really feels good that we got a couple goals in on her.” With time winding down in the third period, Minnesota Duluth pulled its goalie in favor of an extra attacker to attempt to mount a comeback. It resulted in with an empty net goal with just over a minute left  in the third period to give Skaggs a hat trick for the game. Skaggs credited her success to the fact that she played with a new line for this series.“My line was clicking really well due to our hard week of practice,” Skaggs said. “It helped us learn to work well with each other and push each other. It definitely flowed into the game with us making good passes and finding seams, which helped with the success.” Ohio State next travels up to Mankato, Minnesota to play Minnesota State. Games will be played at 7:00 p.m. on Dec. 1 and at 3:00 p.m on Dec. 2. read more

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first_imgSacking Mrs Rew proves Angus Council have an absolute 0 banter policy— Boyle (@Boyle42634) September 29, 2015 The two-year order means she can remain on the teaching register, but must comply with conditions including being tested for alcohol in her blood every six months.Mrs Rew accepted she had acted inappropriately by using inappropriate language, including swearing, and had told a male pupil to “put his body away as it was too sexy”.She also “held her breasts and made comments about them; entered pupils’ bedrooms, ate crisps and sweets and thereafter reached into her top to take crisps from between her breasts”.The panel decided that because of her personal difficulties, and support from staff, pupils and parents, it would be unreasonable to declare her unfit to teach. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A head teacher who was sacked after getting drunk on a school trip “held her breasts and made comments about them” and told a schoolboy his body was “too sexy”.Gillian Rew, 49, also told another pupil his chest “was better than her husband’s”, while she was drunk on the visit to Lockerbie in September 2014.During the weekend away, the former Arbroath High School head teacher was said to have pulled herself up from the floor by holding on to a pupil’s ankles, and to have held crisps between her breasts.She has not been struck off the teaching register, but has been given a two year “conditional registration order”, which involves regular alcohol testing. Gillian Rew Last month, she admitted at a General Teaching Council Scotland (GTCS) hearing that she drank eight glasses of wine before having “improper contact” with students.She was sacked from her £74,000-a-year post following the incident, but her admission of guilt meant that details of the charges were not revealed in the hearing.The nature of her behaviour only emerged yesterday in details published by the GTCS. She was “mortified” by her behaviour and said she was partly drinking too much at Lockerbie Manor as a result of 14-hour days among colleagues who were hostile at the time. She did not think her pupils would have been particularly alarmed.On the night in question she stayed up until four in the morning and drank eight glasses of sauvignon blanc from a wine box. She has since undergone alcohol counselling and now works for EIS, the teaching union. She said her days leading a school were over. Mrs Rew came to a party with us aswell and k’oed on the couch, that’s the way teachers should be, god bless Gillian rew— Rory McQuillan (@razmcquillan) October 3, 2014 Mrs Rew now works for the EISCredit:Callum Masonlast_img read more

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first_imgDr Chris Moulton, of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, told the BBC: “Patients who are delayed like this are still being monitored by staff. But we know that the overcrowding we are seeing is dangerous.”It leads to worse outcomes for patients – higher infection rates, patients ending up on the wrong wards, and generally a negative experience.”Dr Moulton believes there are too few beds. There are just over 100,000 general beds in England – a fall of 40,000 in the past 20 years.”We simply don’t have enough,” he said. “If you compare us to other European countries we are really short and the demands being placed on the health service means we are now struggling to cope.” Almost half a million emergency patients had to wait more than four hours for a bed between October 2015 and September 2016. File pictureCredit:Peter Byrne/PA While the waits are known as trolley waits, some patients wait in side rooms, seats in the A&E department and spare cubicles before being admitted to a ward.The BBC also reported that three-quarters of hospitals are reporting bed shortages. Bed occupancy is not meant to exceed 85 per cent, to give staff time to clean beds, keep infections low and ensure patients who need beds can be found them quickly.But 130 out of 179 hospital trusts are reporting rates exceeding this for general use beds.Siva Anandaciva, of NHS Providers, which represents hospitals, said: “These figures are deeply worrying. We are heading into winter in a more fragile state than I have seen in the past 10 years or so.”Even the historically top-performing trusts are being challenged, which shows that this is an issue affecting all parts of health.”No one wants to see people waiting in corridors, side rooms and emergency bays when they should be admitted to a hospital bed.”These patients are still under the care of doctors and nurses, of course, but it is not ideal for them and we know overcrowding leads to worse outcomes.” Hospital ward These figures are deeply worrying. We are heading into winter in a more fragile state than I have seen in the past 10 years or soSiva Anandaciva, NHS Providers Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. There has been a sharp rise in “trolley waits” – the length of time people wait for a hospital bed after being admitted in an emergency, figures show.Data shows 473,453 patients waited more than four hours between October 2015 and September 2016 – almost a five-fold increase since 2010/11, analysis by the BBC found.The figure represents 11 per cent of the 4.2 million patients admitted over the period. More than 1,400 faced delays of more than 12 hours.In 2010/11, there were 97,559 trolley waits – although NHS England said a small fraction of the rise could be attributed to a change in the way the waits were measured last December.last_img read more

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first_imgOne of the prongs on the sculpture of Neptune and Triton was knocked off Credit:V&A Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Nearly 1,000 precious items in Britain’s national museums and galleries have been damaged over the last decade as a result of careless handling, transit, vandalism and visitor accidents, it has emerged.Paintings, sculptures and historic artefacts have been left in need to repair after a string of incidents, including staff tripping over in the dark, children getting their hands on canvases and a leaking tin of Fray Bentos spoiling a display.A Freedom of Information request has revealed 966 works recorded as damaged across the British Museum, V&A, Tate, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Science Museum and Imperial War Museum.Among the casualties include works by Barbara Hepworth, Anish Kapoor, Mark Rothko, Damian Hirst, Roy Lichtenstein, Jeff Koons, Salvador Dali, Auguste Rodin, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, John Constable, and Sir Joshua Reynolds. Message from a Friend, by Joan Miro, which was damagedCredit:Tate British Museum There have been mishaps at the British MuseumCredit:Alex Segre /Alamy And at Tate, Eve Rothschild’s Knock Knock, Jeremy Moon’s Untitled2/72, Joan Miro’s Message From a Friend, Christina Mackie’s Shakeman and David Batchelor’s I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me were all damaged by children touching them, while Mark Rothko’s Black on Maroon was left with two small visible handprints in 2009.More innocent mistakes include a V&A hat stand damaged when a visitor used it to hang their coat, and an Imperial War Museum ration book spoiled when a corroded tin of Fray Bentos scotch broth soup leaked its contents over a display case.Hundreds of other items across the London museums were spoiled while being moved around museums or out on loan. The items were each repaired by the museum’s own conservation departments, with all declining to place a value on how much the works cost.A spokesman for the V&A said the damaged items comprised less than 0.015 per cent of the museum’s total collection, adding: “While every case of damage is a matter for regret, we are absolutely committed to good practice and careful risk management as we handle, display, move and store the objects in our care.”The British Museum said the collection was of the “utmost importance”, with damaged objects comprising 0.32 per cent of its total, adding: “But we also have a responsibility to make the collection accessible to a wide public.”The National Portrait Gallery said “rare and minor incidences” had been treated successfully with staff undergoing refresher training in object handling, the Science Museum said it regularly reviewed object protection policies and Tate insisted it has “relevant measures in place to ensure the protection and care of the artworks both in transit and on display”. I Love King's Cross and King's Cross Loves Mecenter_img Other works date back centuries, from Roman and Greek marble to Egyptian mummies and Bronze Age weapons. Causes of damage include knocks in transit, graffiti and the sticky fingers of young visitors permitted to get up close and personal with works of art.On several occasions, items were hit by catering staff setting up for events, including a 2008 V&A accident where a waiter knocked a prong off a 1622 marble Neptune and Triton trident with a crate of wine glasses, and a scrape to the frame of a National Portrait Gallery Harold Pinter painting in 2012 when it was bashed by a serving tray.At the British Museum, a clock was damaged when a visitor fell into the front of it, while an installation artwork by Sue Lawty was when a security guard tripped in a darkened gallery at the V&A. The sculpture of Neptune and Triton When asked for a list of objects damaged in the last decade, the British Museum admitted to 263 incidents, the V&A 335 and the Science Museum 217. The Imperial War Museum listed 53 items damaged, with 40 at the National Portrait Gallery, and six at the National Gallery.Tate conceded that 52 works of art had been damaged while under its supervision, but refused to include items that were on loan to its galleries fearing it would put future lenders off.The British Museum recorded 136 acts of graffiti including to the Neroid Monument’s large podium frieze, Didyma sculptures, the Payava Tomb, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, and numerous marble and limestone statues, friezes, reliefs and coffins. Message from a Friend, by Joan Miro, which was damaged I Love King’s Cross and King’s Cross Loves Me was damaged by childrenCredit:Tate At the National Portrait Gallery, three busts of eminent historical figures were vandalised with lipstick, a sculpture by Anthony Caro left with two marks to the forehead after a visitor struck it twice with a cane, and a statue of Victoria and Albert by William Theed was fractured after a member of the public tried to remove its sword.The National Gallery also suffered attacks from members of the public, with Constable’s The Hay Wain, Nicolas Poussin’s The Adoration of the Golden Calf and The Adoration of the Shepherds, and Domenico Veneziano’s Head of a Tonsured, Bearded Saint attacked with pens, paint and a superglued photograph on the canvas.At the Science Museum, 75 items were damaged by the actions of members of the public and another 40 damage by staff. The modern policy of encouraging children to interact in museums and galleries has also had an effect.At the V&A, a carved column dating from 1225-50 Sicily or Calabria suffered small fragments breaking away, “probably eroded by children climbing”.last_img read more

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first_imgPrince Charles Prince Charles and Camilla's trip to Vienna is the last leg of their European tour The Duchess later visited the Spanish Riding School for a spectacular performance, greeting horses with lumps of sugar and confident pats.The Prince, meanwhile, undertook a roundtable discussion on  tackling modern slavery,  human trafficking and discrimination.The Prince and Duchess were then set to conclude their European tour, widely believed to be an exercise in soft charm in the wake of the Brexit vote, with a reception with the British Ambassador before flying home on the government’s RAF plane on Thursday night. Princess Alice of Battenburg, a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria and mother of the Duke of Edinburgh, sheltered a Jewish family, the Cohens, in her home when Greece was occupied by Nazi forces.Living opposite the Gestapo headquarters in Athens, she refused to give them away even when her home was threatened with being searched.Princess Alice, who was given the honour of being buried in Israel’s Mount of Olives,  was later recognised by Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial as a Righteous Among the Nations, and was posthumously awarded the British Government’s Hero of the Holocaust medal.The Prince told the group: “My father’s mother took in a Jewish family during the war and hid them. She was amazing, my grandmother. “She took them in during the Nazi occupation. She never told anybody, she didn’t tell her family for many years.”She’s buried in Jerusalem. In September last year I went to the funeral of President (Shimon) Peres and finally got to see her grave.” The Duchess identified her Zweigelt Thorsaulen 2014 red wine as having a “slight peppery taste”.Laughing, the Prince said: “I always find it so difficult, the words you experts use to describe – all these adjectives.” After sampling red and white wines grown at the vineyard on site, they were given a small selection of newly-grown vines to take home as gifts.As the Prince wondered aloud over whether the soil in Britain would suit the vines, the Duchess assured him the chalky soil in the south of England would suit it well.”I bow to your knowledge of these things,” the Prince told her affectionately. “My wife is a great red wine enthusiast,” he added. Holocaust survivor Gerda Frei, 80, said afterwards: “It is wonderful that the Prince and Duchess came here.”The Prince told us how proud he was of his grandmother, Princess Alice of Greece, who hid a Jewish family from the Nazis.”Mrs Frei said the Prince of Wales told her he had laid flowers from his own garden at Birkhall at her grave.Princess Alice’s remains are buried at the Church of St Mary Magdalene, above the Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives.She was re-interred in Jerusalem in 1988, but it was not until 1994 that the Duke of Edinburgh visited his mother’s grave when he travelled to Israel for a ceremony honouring her for saving Greek Jews during the Second World War.In September 1943, she had agreed to take in members of the Cohen family: the widow and two of the five children of Haimaki Cohen, who had helped the Greek royal family to shelter from flood decades before in a moral debt they had offered to one day repay. She hid Rachel Cohen and children Michel and Tilde in her palace until the Nazis withdrew in October 1944. During that time, the Nazis sent the vast majority of Greece’s Jewish community to concentration camps.It was a moment of solemnity in a busy day for the Royal couple, who spent their final afternoon in Vienna taking in the culture with wine tasting, a performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony by the Vienna Philharmonic and a visit to the spectacular Spanish riding school. Prince Charles arrives for a rehearsal of the Vienna Philharmonic OrchestraCredit:HERBERT PFARRHOFER/AFP Prince Charles arrives for a rehearsal of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestracenter_img The Duchess of Cornwall showed off her knowledge of fine wines at Weinbau Buscheschank Obermann vineyard, while the Prince of Wales admitted he struggles to keep up with the language of wine tasters. The Prince of Wales has told of his pride at his “amazing” grandmother, who saved the lives of a Jewish family by sheltering them from Nazis during the Second World War.The Prince, who first visited his paternal grandmother’s grave in Israel last year, told how he took flowers from his garden in Birkhall for the deeply moving visit.He and his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, spent the morning with Holocaust survivors at the Jewish Museum in Vienna, during the final leg of their nine-day tour of Europe. They included Auschwitz survivor Freddie Knoller, now 95, Gerda Frei, 80, and Harry Bibring, 91, who escaped on the Kindertransport after his family shop was destroyed in Kristallnacht.After asking for their stories over a cup of tea, the Prince told the group of his grandmother’s own experience, loyalty and heroics during the war. Prince Charles talks to a holocaust survivor on ThursdayCredit:HANS KLAUS TECHT/AFP Princess Alice of Battenberg Princess Alice of Battenberg, the grandmother of Prince CharlesCredit:Tophams Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Prince Charles and Camilla’s trip to Vienna is the last leg of their European tourCredit:HANS PUNZ /AFPlast_img read more

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first_imgA carpet of messages of support and floral tributes to the victims of the Manchester attack lies in St Ann's Square in Manchester A carpet of messages of support and floral tributes to the victims of the Manchester attack lies in St Ann’s Square in ManchesterCredit:BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images Armed police are just you and me, people’s family members, highly trained having chosen to protect us. Say hi and smile and maybe thanku too— Nick Knowles (@MrNickKnowles) May 26, 2017 He said: “It’s great to see so many people coming into the city centre to support these events this weekend, enjoying everything this great city has to offer and showing that people are feeling safe.”Regardless of the support that we’re receiving it’s so important that we remember the people who matter most in this – the people who have lost their lives and their loved ones, and the people who were injured. We’re thinking about you all.” The police officer also said that “Manchester is open for business” but said to be aware that there is an increased police presence. In a statement, he wrote: “My officers, as well as those across the Force, have been working long hours since Monday night and, like everyone, they have been greatly affected by what’s happened.”However, what’s really helped us through a difficult few days has been the overwhelming support and kindness from the people of Manchester. I want to thank each and every person who has added to this”. Police officers have thanked the public for their kindness, and said it “got them through” the aftermath of the Manchester terror attack, when the country was on Critical terror alert and emergency services worked round the clock.Members of the public sent in pizza and tea as well as demonstrating other acts of kindness, to show their gratitude to the officers working to keep the country safe.Inspector Phil Spurgeon said that support from the public came in many ways, “from hugs and kind words to boxes of pizzas being delivered to police stations”.He said: “Just today, a lady who wanted to do her ‘bit’ for Manchester has arranged for a delivery of 2,400 tea bags to be brought to us to be able to make a warm brew after patrols.” He urged everyone to enjoy their Bank Holiday as usual – go sunbathing and shopping and spend time with friends and family. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In the majority of cases however, the left ventricle returns to normal over a few days, weeks or months. “Worryingly, these patients’ hearts appear to show a form of scarring, indicating that full recovery may take much longer, or indeed may not occur, with current care.”This highlights the need to urgently find new and more effective treatments for this devastating condition.”The team in Aberdeen used ultrasound and cardiac MRI scans to look at how their patients’ hearts were functioning.The results showed that the syndrome permanently affected the heart’s pumping motion and delayed the “wringing” motion made by the beating heart.The heart’s squeezing motion was also affected, and parts of the heart muscle suffered scarring, which affected its elasticity and prevented it from contracting properly.Dr Dana Dawson, reader in cardiovascular medicine at the University of Aberdeen, who led the research, said: “We used to think that people who suffered from takotsubo cardiomyopathy would fully recover, without medical intervention.”Here we’ve shown that this disease has much longer lasting damaging effects on the hearts of those who suffer from it.”Figures show that between three per cent and 17 per cent of sufferers die within five years of diagnosis. “This study has shown that in some patients who develop takotsubo syndrome, various aspects of heart function remain abnormal for up to four months afterwards,” said BHF associate medical director, Professor Metin Avkiran. Juliet could not live after finding lover Romeo deadCredit:Film Stills/Film Stills Queen Victoria was said to have neglected her children because her love for Prince Albert was so greatCredit:PA/PA Claire Danes and Leonardo DiCaprio in a scene from Film Romeo and Juliet center_img Songwriters, poets and novelists have long mused over whether time truly heals everything.Charles Dickens toyed over whether the bitter Miss Haversham would ever recover from being jilted at the altar, and for many historians, Queen Victoria’s black dress came to symbolise her irreparable suffering over Prince Albert’s death.But a new study has apparently put their agonising to bed and concluded that not even the clock can always mend a broken heart.A team of medical researchers from the University of Aberdeen have said that so-called “broken heart syndrome” can leave physical scars that never recover.British Heart Foundation-funded study followed 52 patients over four months, aged between 28 and 87, who suffered with what is officially known as takotsubo syndrome.The little-known condition was first coined in Japan in 1990 and named after the native word for an octopus pot, which has a unique shape that resembles a broken left ventricle.It is provoked when the heart muscle is suddenly “stunned”, causing the left ventricle to change shape, and is typically prompted by “intense emotional or physical stress”.It affects the heart’s ability to pump blood and, according to the BHF, there remains no known medical cure. Handout photo dated 1890 of Queen Victoria Around 3,000 people per year in the UK suffer from the rare syndrome, which mostly affects women. Clinicians will usually follow up with regular echocardiograms, and unless a patient has an underlying heart problem, no further treatment is necessary.The BHF says more research is needed to establish whether takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be passed down through family.Journalists speculated whether actress Debbie Reynolds’s death in December – one day after her daughter Carrie Fisher of Star Wars fame – was caused by a broken heart.Son Todd Fisher, however, said she just wanted to be with her daughter.The study is published today in the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography. Around 90 per cent are female and the stressful trigger – often associated with the sudden death of a loved one – is identified in around 70 per cent of cases.last_img read more

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