Archive : 香草419

Donegal architects scoop national award for local project

first_imgA Donegal architectural firm has proven it can rub shoulders with the best of them after scooping a national award for their work.McCabe Architects in Donegal Town won ‘Tourism & Hospitality Project of the Year’ at the 2019 Irish Construction Industry Awards in the Citywest Hotel, Dublin on Thursday night.The prize was awarded for ‘Cé Rath Maoláin’ a Public Convenience Building at Rathmullan Pier commissioned by Donegal County Council and designed by McCabe Architects. The judges commended the way the building integrated so well in its historic setting, the use of materials and elegant form of the building.The firm beat off stiff competition including Centre Parcs, Longford and the newly refurbished Café en Seine, Dublin to take the prestigious award.Managing director Declan McCabe and his talented team are behind some of the North-West’s most stunning designs and their work is now in demand nationwide.The iconic buildings at Rathmullan Pier designed by McCabe Architects which scooped the award.Donegal architects scoop national award for local project was last modified: June 16th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BuildingcouncilMcCabe ArchitectsRathmullanlast_img read more

Van der Linde is ‘halfway champ’ at ADAC GT Masters

first_img10 June 2014Teenage South African motor racing prodigy Kelvin van der Linde combined with Germany’s Rene Rast to finish 10th and second in a Prosperia C. Abt Audi R8 in the two one-hour races that made up the fourth round of the ADAC GT Masters at the Red Bull Ring in Austria on Sunday.The pair has now finished on the podium six times in eight races and leads the eight- round championship at the halfway stage by 10 points.They won the second race in round one in Oschersleben, Germany, in April, making Van der Linde the youngest-ever GT Masters race winner.A major achievementThe weekend’s result was a major achievement for Audi, which had not previously managed a podium finish at the Red Bull Ring around a high-speed circuit that favoured the big capacity-engined American Chevrolet Camaro and Corvette.Both races were won by Oliver Gavin of Great Britain (41) and German Daniel Keilwitz (24) in a 5.2-litre V8 Callaway Chevrolet Corvette.Happy“Our top 10 finish in race one after starting from 14th on the grid was like a podium and second place in race two from sixth on the grid was like a win for the team,” said a happy Van der Linde after the races.The reigning European Volkswagen Scirocco R-Cup champion and South African Motor Sportsman of the Year was full of praise for his team: “It was a tough weekend and we had a difficult job to do today. We maximised our package at a track that did not suit our car.“Rene is a great team-mate and drove magnificently and, thanks to a team that had a good strategy and did everything right, we proudly stand on the podium.“Being the unofficial ‘halftime champions’, as they say here, is very promising as the circuits that lie ahead are better suited to the Audi.”CompetitionThe series is open to sports cars that comply with the International Automobile Federation’s (FIA) technical regulations and is contested by the Audi R8 LMS Ultra, BMW Z4 GT3, Chevrolet Camaro GT, Chevrolet Corvette Z06.R, Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG gullwing, Porsche 911 GT3 R, Lamborghini Gallardo FL2 and McLaren MP4-12C GT3.With four rounds and eight races remaining, the South African/German duo leads the championship with 120 points. Second is Holland’s Jaap van Lagen, in a Porsche 911 GT3 R (he has had three different co-drivers to date) with 110 points, and third are Claudia Hurtgen of Germany and Dominik Baumann of Austria in a BMW Z4 with 94 points.Next roundThe next round of the championship is at the Slovakia Ring in Slovakia on 9 and 10 August.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Ebuni | Modern Alice French Hair Claw Clip – Tortoiseshell – look nice, and hold your hair pretty tight

first_imgColour: Tortoiseshell / Brown Appreciate it, a slightly various design to the typical clips.Retains hair incredibly well little bit around priced i believe.I purchased this as a a person of a amount of christmas offers for my spouse and she liked it.Features of Ebuni | Modern Alice French Hair Claw Clip – Tortoiseshell (Brown)Made in FranceStrong Glossy Plastic with hand applied finishQuality Metal SpringColour: Tortoiseshell / BrownSize: 8cm x 5cm x 3.5cmMade in France Would have given a full 5 stars had the postage charge been a little less steep. 99 would have expected earlier delivery than 3 days later. Also, although very well packaged, it was perhaps a little bit too much overkill with layers of popper-wrap, tissue, a large sturdy box and tissue paper. But all in all very nice comfortable hair claw with which i am happy. As constantly with ebuni, good good quality and pretty properly packaged.Both equally points i have bought from in this article from ebuni are high good quality: seem nice, and hold your hair really limited.Really wonderful hair clip awesome structure lovely tortoise shell genuinely pleased with it arrived nowadays arrived in a box with plenty of bundle thankyou.The most sturdy claw clip i have ever experienced.look nice, and hold your hair pretty tightMy wife loved this clip.great quality and very well packaged Strong Glossy Plastic with hand applied finish Size: 8cm x 5cm x 3.5cm Quality Metal Spring SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-07-13 23:34:02Reviewed Item Ebuni | Modern Alice French Hair Claw Clip – Tortoiseshell (Brown)Rating 5.0 / 5  stars, based on  12  reviewsPrice£8.00last_img read more

Alberta sees big drop in charitable donations

first_imgAnother sign of the hard times in Alberta; people are really starting to tighten the purse strings when it comes to charitable donations.The latest figures from Statistics Canada show total donations reported by Canadian tax filers fell almost three per cent in 2016 to $8.9 billion.The largest decrease was in Alberta: a drop of 10.7 per cent.The next biggest drop was Prince Edward Island at a little more than five per cent.Even with the decrease, Alberta still had a higher number of people making donations, about 21 per cent, than the national average, 20.5 per cent, and the second highest median donations at $470 compared with the national median donation of $300.Donors in Lethbridge had the second highest median charitable donations in the country at $620.Calgary United Way COO Beth Gignac said the trend of year over year declines continued in 2017.She explained the economic turbulence means a lot of people are out of the work force, and now rely on agencies they would normally donate to.“What we’re doing and have been doing over the past year is working with our agency partners to talk about ways in which we can think our way through this problem together,” she said.That includes working with corporate workplace partners and getting the message across that even a small contribution can have a big impact.Gignac said the greatest challenge as an organization, given what’s happening, is to still be able to provide sustainable funding to the 104 agencies they support.last_img read more

Trial begins over fuel spill in English Bay one defendant doesnt show

first_imgVANCOUVER – A port worker says he suspected large plumes of oil that were shining on the surface of the water in Vancouver’s harbour nearly three years ago was bunker fuel, based on the smell.A B.C. provincial court judge heard Monday that Mark James of the Port of Metro Vancouver responded to reports of a spill on April 15, 2015.“When you smell gasoline, you know the smell of gasoline,” James testified on the opening day of a trial for a company and vessel charged after the spill. “We knew it was bunker oil, which was serious.”The charges were laid after 2,700 litres of fuel leaked into English Bay.A judge earlier allowed the trial to go ahead even without one defendant attending the hearing.The Greek shipping firm Alassia NewShips Management Inc. and the vessel MV Marathassa face 10 environmental related charges, including alleged violations under the Fisheries Act and the Canadian Environment Protection Act.Alassia has denied ownership of the Marathassa and the company was not represented in court on Monday. Judge Kathryn Denhoff previously ruled the trial would proceed without Alassia’s participation, and she affirmed that decision as the trial began.Outside court, Crown attorney Jessica Lawn said Alassia is the alleged operator of the vessel and evidence supporting that assertion could be valuable to the case.“It’s the Crown’s duty to prove that Alassia, as charged on the information, committed the offences in the way that we’ve alleged,” she said.In his testimony, James said he spotted patches of oil as long as 4.5 metres and as wide as two metres while he tried to investigate the source. He described collecting samples and investigating about a half dozen vessels that were anchored in the bay at the time.When he boarded the Marathassa, James said the captain gave him a blank sheet of paper with the vessel’s letterhead so that he could take some of the notes he relied on in court.The Crown had James read the footer of the sheet to the court, which included Alassia’s name, address and contact information.Marathassa’s counsel, David Jones, was in court to cross-examine James.Alassia explained its reasons for not appearing in provincial court in a separate decision from the B.C. Supreme Court, saying to do so would indicate it recognizes the court’s authority to hear the case.In that case, the firm is fighting the process used to serve a summons. The court supported a justice of the peace’s certification of the summons in a ruling last fall, but Alassia has filed an appeal.Lawn said if convicted, the firm and vessel could face significant fines, with maximum penalty for some of the violations set at $4 million.First responders, investigators from Transport Canada and environmental experts are expected to testify in the coming weeks, Lawn said.The trial is scheduled to continue until April 20.last_img read more

CNN chief Jeff Zucker undergoing heart surgery

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – CNN’s top executive, Jeff Zucker, is undergoing heart surgery and will take a six-week leave of absence from running the news network.CNN said Zucker made the announcement to his staff Thursday following a morning editorial meeting. His top deputy, Michael Bass, will be in charge during his absence.The network said Zucker’s surgery is elective, to address a condition that he has had for a decade. He’s already a cancer survivor. Brian Stelter, CNN’s media reporter, tweeted that Zucker assured staff members that he is going to be fine.CNN, and Zucker in particular, have been frequent targets of President Donald Trump’s campaign against the media.last_img

AP FACT CHECK Trump myths on dipping oil prices cold snaps

first_imgWASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is wrong when he suggests global warming can’t be happening if it’s really cold outside.He points to a “brutal and extended cold blast” in the Eastern U.S. during Thanksgiving week and wonders aloud to his Twitter followers, “Whatever happened to Global Warming?” In fact, he is confusing short-term weather patterns with longer-term climate change. A scientific report put out Friday by his own administration rejects as folly any notion that a particular plunge in temperatures can cast doubt on whether Earth is warming.Explaining his decision not to punish Saudi Arabia for the killing of a U.S.-based journalist, Trump also exaggerates the value of Saudi investments in the U.S. and expresses thanks to the kingdom — then himself — for spurring a recent decline in oil prices. Those claims are off the mark.A look at his recent rhetoric, also covering the courts, midterm elections and more.OIL PRICESTRUMP: “So great that oil prices are falling (thank you President T). Add that, which is like a big Tax Cut, to our other good Economic news. Inflation down (are you listening Fed)!” — tweet Sunday.TRUMP: “Oil prices getting lower. Great! Like a big Tax Cut for America and the World. Enjoy! $54, was just $82. Thank you to Saudi Arabia, but let’s go lower!” — tweet Wednesday.THE FACTS: Heaping praise on Saudi Arabia, then himself, for lower oil prices is a gross oversimplification. Oil prices, which peaked Oct. 3, have been falling on the realization that U.S. sanctions against Iran would not create a shortage and on fear that slower economic growth internationally will depress energy demand.Although the U.S. is now the world’s biggest oil producer, Saudi Arabia remains the biggest exporter. As a so-called swing producer with the ability to adjust production up or down relatively quickly, it can indeed influence the price of crude. But the market is far more complex than Trump suggests. Canada is actually the leading source of U.S. oil imports, for example, with Saudi Arabia second.___CLIMATETRUMP: “This is the coldest weather in the history of the Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC, and one of the coldest Thanksgivings on record!” — tweet Thursday.TRUMP: “Brutal and Extended Cold Blast could shatter ALL RECORDS – Whatever happened to Global Warming?” — tweet Wednesday.THE FACTS: Trump is conflating weather and climate. Weather is like mood, which changes daily. Climate is like personality, which is long term.The climate is warming, which still allows for record cold spells.On Friday, the White House produced the National Climate Assessment by scientists from 13 Trump administration agencies and outside scientists. It amounted to a slap in the face for those who question whether climate is changing.“Climate change is transforming where and how we live and presents growing challenges to human health and quality of life, the economy, and the natural systems that support us,” the report says. It details how global warming from the burning of coal, oil and gas is hurting each region of U.S. and different sectors of the economy. The report said the last few years have smashed U.S. records for damaging weather, already costing nearly $400 billion since 2015, and projects increased deaths and disease.The White House report swept aside the idea, already discredited, that a particular plunge in temperatures can cast uncertainty on whether Earth is warming. It says more than 90 per cent of current warming is caused by humans: “There are no credible alternative human or natural explanations supported by the observational evidence.”“Over shorter timescales and smaller geographic regions, the influence of natural variability can be larger than the influence of human activity,” the report says. “Over climate timescales of multiple decades, however, global temperature continues to steadily increase.”In other words, there are cold days in a warming climate.___THE COURTSTRUMP: “Justice Roberts can say what he wants, but the 9th Circuit is a complete & total disaster. It is out of control, has a horrible reputation, is overturned more than any Circuit in the Country, 79%, & is used to get an almost guaranteed result.” — tweet Thursday.TRUMP: “It would be great if the 9th Circuit was indeed an “independent judiciary,” but if it is why … are so are so many opposing view (on Border and Safety) cases filed there, and why are a vast number of those cases overturned. Please study the numbers, they are shocking.” — tweets Wednesday.THE FACTS: He’s incorrect in suggesting that rulings by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco are reversed by the Supreme Court more frequently than those of any other federal appeals court. His description of the “shocking” number of overturned cases in the 9th Circuit belies the nature of the appeals system.When the Supreme Court hears a case, it is more likely to overturn it than not. It does so about two-thirds of the time.In the last term, the Supreme Court overturned 100 per cent of the decisions of the 1st Circuit in Boston, the 3rd Circuit in Philadelphia and the 6th Circuit in Cincinnati. For the 9th Circuit, 86 per cent were overturned.Over the past five years, the Supreme Court overturned a greater percentage of rulings from the 3rd Circuit (92.3 per cent), the 6th Circuit (85.1 per cent) and the Atlanta-based 11th Circuit (81.8 per cent) than from the 9th (77.4 per cent), according to The Associated Press’ analysis of statistics from the legal website Scotusblog.The 9th is by far the largest of the 13 federal courts of appeals, covering Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. That means that in raw numbers, more cases are heard and reversed from the 9th year in and year out. But that does not make it the most frequently overturned.On Monday, U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar, who’d been nominated by Democratic President Barack Obama, temporarily barred the Trump administration from refusing asylum to immigrants who cross the southern border illegally. That set off Trump’s ire. Any appeal is likely to go to the 9th Circuit.Trump’s tweets took issue with an unusual rebuke from the U.S. chief justice, John Roberts. Roberts spoke up for the independence of the judiciary after Trump branded Tigar an “Obama judge” and said “We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges.”___THE ELECTIONTRUMP, on his impact on the midterm elections: “Look at Florida. I went down to Florida. Rick Scott won and he won by a lot. I don’t know what happened to all those votes that disappeared at the very end. And if I didn’t put a spotlight on that election before it got down to the 12,500 votes, he would’ve lost that election, OK? … They would have taken that election away from him.” — interview with “Fox News Sunday,” broadcast on Nov. 18.THE FACTS: Trump is exaggerating the vote margin of Scott’s victory in Florida’s Senate race as being “a lot.” He’s also suggesting without evidence that his own efforts prevented Democrats from engaging in voter fraud.Scott, Florida’s Republican governor, edged out Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson in the closest Senate race in the nation in the midterm elections — by a margin of 10,033 votes, or 0.12 percentage points. It also was the closest Senate race in Florida since at least 1978, according to the Florida’s Division of Elections website. It required two recounts — by machine and by hand — as mandated by state law due to the razor-thin margins.Trump asserts without evidence that the attention he brought to the Senate race prevented Democrats from “taking” that election from Scott, hinting at voter fraud by suggesting votes “disappeared at the very end.”Despite Trump’s repeated claims after the Nov. 6 election of Florida races being potentially “stolen,” the state agencies charged with investigating potential fraud have said no credible allegations exist. It’s not uncommon for vote tallies to change in the days after Election Day as local officials process remaining mailed and provisional ballots. In Florida, Scott saw some of his lead dwindle after the Democratic strongholds of Palm Beach and Broward counties continued to count votes.___SAUDI ARABIATRUMP: “After my heavily negotiated trip to Saudi Arabia last year, the Kingdom agreed to spend and invest $450 billion in the United States. This is a record amount of money. It will create hundreds of thousands of jobs, tremendous economic development, and much additional wealth for the United States. Of the $450 billion, $110 billion will be spent on the purchase of military equipment from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon and many other great U.S. defence contractors. If we foolishly cancel these contracts, Russia and China would be the enormous beneficiaries — and very happy to acquire all of this newfound business.” — statement Tuesday.THE FACTS: He’s greatly overstating the value of expected Saudi investments in the U.S.The arms package, partly negotiated under the Obama administration, mixes old deals, some new business and prospective purchases that have not been worked out.The Pentagon said last month that Saudi Arabia had signed “letters of offer and acceptance” for only $14.5 billion in military purchases and confirmed Tuesday that nothing further has reached that stage.Those letters, issued after the U.S. government approves a proposed arms sale, specify its terms. Much of that $14.5 billion involves a missile defence system, a contract that appears to have advanced more than other significant investments but not been completed.Moreover, the State Department estimated last year that if the full $110 billion in prospective arms business is fulfilled, it could end up “potentially supporting tens of thousands of new jobs in the United States.” That’s a far cry from the 500,000 to 600,000 jobs that Trump has said the arms deal is worth.Details of the package have been sketchy, with no public breakdown of exactly what was being offered for sale and for how much. The government’s Congressional Research Service has described the package as a combination of sales that were proposed by President Barack Obama and discussed with Congress and new sales still being developed.Meanwhile, there has been no verification from either country that “the Kingdom agreed to spend and invest $450 billion in the United States,” as Trump put it in his statement. White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters did not respond to a request to explain the figure.___TRUMP: “Saudi Arabia would gladly withdraw from Yemen if the Iranians would agree to leave. They would immediately provide desperately needed humanitarian assistance.” — statement Tuesday.THE FACTS: This seemingly benign view of Saudi intentions in Yemen does not square with reality on the ground. A Saudi-led blockade is at least partly responsible for widespread starvation in a country where three quarters of the population needs life-saving assistance. It’s the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. The U.S. has scaled back support for the Saudi-led coalition fighting Iranian-backed rebels and is pressing for a cease-fire.The international aid group Save the Children estimated Wednesday that 85,000 Yemeni children younger than 5 have died of hunger and disease since civil war broke out in 2015. The United Nations says more than 1.3 million Yemeni children have suffered from severe acute malnutrition since the coalition went to war against Houthi rebels.___9-11TRUMP: “Of course we should have captured Osama Bin Laden long before we did. I pointed him out in my book just BEFORE the attack on the World Trade Center. President Clinton famously missed his shot. We paid Pakistan Billions of Dollars & they never told us he was living there. Fools!” — tweet Nov. 19.THE FACTS: There was nothing original or clairvoyant in the reference to bin Laden in Trump’s 2000 book. As part of his criticism of what he considered Bill Clinton’s haphazard approach to U.S. security as president, his book stated: “One day we’re told that a shadowy figure with no fixed address named Osama bin Laden is public enemy Number One, and U.S. jetfighters lay waste to his camp in Afghanistan. He escapes back under some rock, and a few news cycles later it’s on to a new enemy and new crisis.”Trump’s book did not call for further U.S. action against bin Laden or al-Qaida to follow up on attacks Clinton ordered in 1998 in Afghanistan and Sudan after al-Qaida bombed the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The U.S. attacks were meant to disrupt bin Laden’s network and destroy some of al-Qaida’s infrastructure, such as a factory in Sudan associated with the production of a nerve gas ingredient. They “missed” in the sense that bin Laden was not killed in them, and al-Qaida was able to pull off 9-11 three years later.In passages on terrorism, Trump’s book correctly predicted that the U.S. was at risk of a terrorist attack that would make the 1993 World Trade Center bombing pale by comparison. That was a widespread concern at the time, as Trump suggested in stating “no sensible analyst rejects this possibility.” Trump did not explicitly tie that threat to al-Qaida and thought an attack might come through the use of a miniaturized weapon of mass destruction, like a nuclear device in a suitcase or anthrax.___Associated Press writers Seth Borenstein, Robert Burns and Josh Boak in Washington, Jill Colvin in Palm Beach, Fla., and David Koenig in Dallas contributed to this report.___Find AP Fact Checks at http://apne.ws/2kbx8bdFollow @APFactCheck on Twitter: https://twitter.com/APFactCheckEDITOR’S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figuresCalvin Woodward And Hope Yen, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Report Hightech robot on Russian TV was man in suit

first_imgMOSCOW — Russian media say a contraption presented by Russian state television as a high-tech robot was in fact a man in a commercially available robot costume.The footage was shot at a high-tech show in the city of Yaroslavl that opened Tuesday, featuring “Boris the Robot.” Forum organizers used Boris to enliven the event, having him dance to a pop song.But a crew for Russian state television apparently thought Boris was real, and used footage of him dancing and speaking as an example of Russian technological prowess.Online TJournal noted the lack of sensors, human-like movements and other discrepancies, and revealed that Boris was in fact a human clad in a costume sold under the name Alyosha by the Russian company Show Robots.The Associated Presslast_img

Cuban fever spreading throughout Ohio

Aroldis Chapman walked into the visitor’s dugout Monday at Huntington Park a few hours before a game against the Columbus Clippers with a toothpick in his mouth and a gold chain around his neck. Behind the smile and glamorous appearance is a 22-year-old man trying to find his way into major league baseball and American culture.  Chapman left Cuba on July 1, 2009. He left his mother, father, two sisters, girlfriend and newborn child behind to pursue his dream of pitching in the major leagues. At 21 years old, Chapman was thrust into a new world surrounded by a language he did not know and a culture he did not understand.  Before coming to the United States, he petitioned major league baseball to become a free agent. After much hype and demand for the Cuban phenomenon, the Cincinnati Reds signed Chapman to a six-year, $30.25 million deal on Jan. 10, 2010. When spring training began, Chapman hoped to make the major league club in Cincinnati, but after a back injury hindered his progress for a couple of days, the Reds decided to send Chapman down to their AAA-affiliate, the Louisville Bats.  His demotion to the minors has not deterred him. “I would have liked to break into camp with the team, but being here has made me happy as well,” said Chapman, who has trainer Tomas Vera translate his Spanish to English. “I am happy here and I know I have to work and make the adjustments on all my pitches.” While Chapman works in the minors to develop his pitching skills, he is slowly learning the details of American baseball. “For example, we had our first game in Toledo,” said Rick Sweet, Louisville’s manager. “He wanted to know who we played the next day. He didn’t understand that we play the same team four days in a row. We gave him a schedule, which told him we go to this city, and each city has its own team.” Sweet acknowledged that Chapman is a work in progress. “He handles [pressure] very well,” Sweet said. “He needs to learn the game of baseball, our style. It is different. We need a ton of work on the fundamentals because I don’t think they’ve done that in Cuba. He’s got a lot to learn and he’s handling it well.” American major league baseball is fundamentally and organizationally different from Cuban baseball.  The Cuban season is only 90 games. In the minor leagues, the Louisville Bats are scheduled to play 143 games, and all major league teams play 162 games. This means that Chapman has to prepare to make anywhere from 10 to 15 more starts than usual. In a league that has grown more conservative with pitch counts and innings pitched, Chapman does not seem worried. “I don’t have any concerns about my conditioning,” Chapman said. “I have been preparing really well. I have been working hard and I don’t want to have any problems. I know this is a long season, but I know I will be ready and OK.” Chapman, along with Washington Nationals prospect Stephen Strasburg, has been the focus of much media attention. Both pitchers have been clocked at over 100 mph on multiple occasions, and their potential and talent level is comparable. But, as Strasburg can just concentrate on baseball, Chapman needs to learn fundamentals as well as understand the American way of life. “The hardest part [in America] has been off-the-field things,” Chapman said. “I have to be able to adapt and I am going through that. Baseball has been normal for me. I have more problems adapting outside [baseball]. There has been a lot of stuff to learn.” Though Chapman will have to battle off-the-field perplexities, he shouldn’t have a problem transferring his previous pitching success to America. In his professional debut on Sunday, Chapman pitched 4 2/3 innings, giving up one unearned run, while striking out nine batters. In addition, the stadium radar gun showed he hit 100 mph five times.  “I don’t know if I have seen that total in my career,” Sweet said. While integrating himself into American society has been difficult, Chapman feels this is the right thing to do. The only problem is that it comes at a personal price.  “I feel great. I am playing on the best baseball [stage] in the world,” Chapman said. “This is what I really want and that makes me feel gracious and happy, but the day I will be completely happy is when I have my family with me.” read more